Community Outreach: Talking about the animals

Excellent post from Speaking of Research – well worth a read.


Many of us that work in biomedical research often are confronted with the dreaded question: “What do you do for a living?” The anxiety of the inevitable conversation about animal research can be palpable. One may ask, “Do I tell them the truth and get into a debate about the ethics of animal research? Or do I tell them that I am an accountant, thus avoiding any further conversation about my career?” Although distorting the truth works, but it does a great disservice to all those involved. How will people really understand animal research unless accurate, balanced information is provided? Historically, the majority of the information available is from science journals or biased animal rights groups. As a result, the bulk of the information is skewed to paint animal research as a vile, unethical institution that cares little about the animals. On the other hand, science journals describe the science, written for scientists. How does the lay person get that accurate information? That accurate information comes from you, the one that works in the industry.

It is important to note that I do not speak for all individuals in this field, but the sentiment behind my words is shared by the vast majority. Those of us that have chosen to work in this field have done so for very specific reasons:  Some of us do it to be a part of human and/or animal medical advances; others do it because they feel passionate about animal welfare and, of course, there will always be a few people who do it solely because they like having a steady job with a steady paycheck. Fortunately, the vast majority of people in the industry do not subscribe to the latter reason.

The fact that many people disapprove of animal research, but nearly all benefit from it, indicates that most people do not truly understand how biomedical research works. From food and drug production to vaccines, surgical and disease treatments, humans have benefited from animal research for hundreds of years. The sheer shock that the public has in reaction to animal research stories indicates that more education is needed. For example, the A.L.S. ice bucket challenge was all the rage last year, yet some people complained they did not want their charitable dollars to go towards animal research. The fact that some people did not know that all medical testing and treatments have or will go through animal testing before use in humans demonstrates the lack of education regarding the system. It is now time to explain it. When it comes to public opinion it is important to understand that people’s perception of complicated and controversial subjects is dramatically affected by the available information to which they are exposed. We can thank the biased animal rights groups for providing the bulk of the misinformation about research that exists today. They have had years to twist the truth and present their information in a way that immediately causes negative emotional responses in those that are subjected to this information. That is the same stance those of us in research must take. We must talk about what we do, but it should be made personal. This is the only way the lay person will be able to relate, at the personal level.

When I think of a personal story that describes the environment of research as well as the people and animals, I think of Duncan. Duncan was a chimpanzee I had the honor to know while working as a veterinary technician. Since he didn’t have a family group, he had to be housed singly, along with three other lone males. We were tasked to give them a little extra attention. Although I spent time with all of the males, Duncan was, by far, my favorite. I spent many hours over the years sitting next to his enclosure and talking to him. Of course, he would nod and grunt at me, not allowing me to feel too crazy speaking to an animal. One day, Duncan became sick. He had saculitis (inflammation of his air sacs) that was not responding to treatment.   After weeks of diligent care, Duncan succumbed to his disease. I was holding him and petting him the day he passed. As he lay breathing his last breath, I looked around me. All I saw was a family crying over the loss of a member. From care techs to managers and veterinarians, we all cried together. The loss of this amazing creature shook everyone to the core. This pain can only be compared to the loss of a human loved one. I felt great comfort in knowing that we all mourned Duncan and that we, as the caregivers that did more than just feed him, we loved him.   It is with stories like this, that the true face of biomedical research can be seen, from great love and compassion. These are the stories we need to tell.

CC-BY-NC-SA

Once an individual is empowered to speak up about research and tell their story, as I was through Duncan, the next step is to determine the outlet and the audience. Anyone can get involved with outreach; locally or nationally. Some examples are: Institute of Animal Technology (IAT), American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS), technical schools, local career days, contributions to web sites publishing articles about science and, of course, casual conversation. Please see the end of this article for links to various avenues for outreach.

Regardless of the platform for outreach, the target audience should always be considered. Formulate your discussion, lecture, presentation or article around the individual that will be receiving the information. If the bulk of your audience is not science based, avoid scientific jargon- speak in plain terms. Most importantly, explain how your work has or may improve medicine as if you are speaking to someone with no knowledge of the inner-workings of research.

Now that you have a story to tell, you may ask yourself: Why should I speak out? The answer is clear.   The people with the best knowledge of the inner workings of research are the best source of information. It is time that the research community counteracts the years animal rights groups have had to speak against research. The best way to counteract those effects is to be open about what we do and how we do it. We should inform the public by providing balanced information. Let them make their own decisions but with correct information, instead of skewed rhetoric that serves only to fuel the extreme views that all animal research is bad and managed by heartless people that do not care about animals or society. Each one of us should be proud of our careers. It is time to show your pride and tell the world what we do and why we do it. We, the research community, are in favor of ethical treatment of animals for biomedical research and would prefer a world where disease did not need to be studied. We would also prefer a world where there was effective and appropriate alternatives for animal research, however, none are currently available or reliable to use for all research. Until that day comes, we will continue to provide the best care we can- not only because it is the law but because it is the right thing to do.

James Champion

Speaking of Research accepts guest posts from researchers, technicians, veterinarians, and those involved in outreach. If you are interested in writing a post for us, please contact us.

Source: Community Outreach: Talking about the animals

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2 thoughts on “Community Outreach: Talking about the animals

  1. Hi,
    As a medical research scientist myself I understand the ‘need’ and ‘use’ for animals in research. Without animals in research, we would not have the advances in medical treatments that we do. However, nothing anyone can say will ever make me ‘like’ the use of animals in research. Therefore, I believe it is our most important job as scientists who ‘need’ to use animals for research to find the most humane and ethical ways of doing so. Having seen many other scientists over the years also working on animals, this is not always the common practice, and animals are being sometimes heavily overused, when careful experimental designs and planning could actually reduce the numbers of animals needed. So I can also understand the point of animal activists, because someone needs to be on the side of the animals too.
    Laura

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  2. That is very true, it’s important to keep the highest standards possible and ensure the welfare of any animal used in research. I’ve been to conferences before where I’ve been very uncomfortable with what some groups in China were doing, although it was considered legal and okay by their government standards. It’s hard to know what to do in those situations.

    I’m glad people are concerned for the animals, but more often than not animal rights activists believe only in a full ban in the use of animals for research and think that we (the scientists who work with animals) don’t care for them at all. I think articles like this one can help combat those beliefs, showing a more emotional side of the researchers. We aren’t at a point, and maybe will never be at a point, where we can bypass the use of all animals in research. There are groups like NC3R (https://www.nc3rs.org.uk/) that provide awards for researchers replacing, reducing, and refining animal use in research, which also advocate for animal welfare while understanding the necessity of animal research. Organoid and stem cell culture is making some progress in terms of replacement, but it will never fully replicate a complete body system, so I believe increasing acceptance for animal research and those who do it is necessary for the future of science.

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